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Posted by . on Dec 9th, 2014 9:52am

The holiday season is officially underway, and we have a lot to be grateful for in Massachusetts, particularly when it comes to healthcare.

More residents have health insurance here than in any other state, with 97% of the population covered. In addition, healthcare cost increases are lower in Massachusetts – at 2.3% coming in well below even the ambitious 3.6% benchmark set by the state in our landmark 2012 healthcare payment and delivery reform law, Ch. 224. Healthcare insurance premiums are also stable, with overall premiums for next year increasing 3.1% and for those shopping on the Massachusetts Health Connector, an even more moderate increase of 1.6% over last year’s rates on average.

Perhaps most importantly, healthcare quality remains outstanding in Massachusetts. We are ranked second in the nation by the prestigious Commonwealth Fund on their Scorecard on State Health System Performance, and placed first in the US for access and prevention/treatment indicators.

Yet there is still more to be done. Massachusetts has appropriately started to move away from fee-for-service payment models for care and toward more patient- and quality-centered standards. Initial research has shown this "global payment" approach can both save money and improve care, and we are fortunate that this movement is being embraced by virtually every acute and even some specialty hospitals, health systems and growing number of physician groups. But in the last year we've stalled in our adoption of such risk-bearing contracts, and are now down nearly 1% from a high of 35.2% in 2012. We still need increased employer and consumer engagement in healthcare, and it is difficult to get healthy individuals to pay attention to non-sexy topics like preventive health and evidence-based medicine – though we are starting to see some movement in this arena thanks to increased price transparency here in Massachusetts and through changes in benefit design.

I believe the way to continue to improve our entire healthcare system in Massachusetts is through alignment – of hospitals, health systems, physicians and other providers throughout the continuum of care, along with the payment mechanisms of government and other insurers. It really will "take a village." While we should appreciate all that we have, our healthcare reform work is not done. Massachusetts hospitals, health systems and provider partners aspire to achieve better outcomes in quality of care; that pursuit will lead to lower costs as well and for both reasons is of utmost priority as we head into the new year.


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