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Posted by . on Jul 13th, 2015 10:46am

Efforts to oppose tobacco use and promotion both nationally and in Massachusetts have me feeling increasingly hopeful that we will indeed "make smoking history" sooner rather than later. Last week's decision by CVS to withdraw from the US Chamber of Commerce in the wake of revelations that the national chamber lobbies heavily against anti-smoking laws, and the strong condemnation of the US Chamber’s position by Congressional leaders including Sen. Elizabeth Warren, as well as by the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce, are breaths of fresh air in the battle against tobacco use.

More Massachusetts cities and towns are working to restrict the availability of tobacco products as well. Natick increased the age at which individuals can purchase tobacco to 21 last April, and Arlington became the most recent municipality to boost the minimum age for tobacco sales to 21 just a couple of weeks ago. Currently, more than 50 Massachusetts municipalities have a 21-year-old age requirement to buy tobacco products. In addition, Attorney General Maura Healey has proposed regulations that will ban the sale of e-cigarettes to minors and regulate them the same way traditional cigarettes are controlled.

All of these measures are a good start, but the health costs of tobacco use are still devastating, with Massachusetts suffering an estimated $6 billion every year in direct healthcare costs and lost productivity due to tobacco-related illness and death. But a hearing before the Massachusetts Legislature’s Joint Committee on Public Health on Tuesday, July 14 will consider testimony on several important tobacco prevention bills that can further improve the state of public health in Massachusetts. The hearing will take begin at 1pm in Room B2 at the State House.

Among the bills under consideration at the hearing are several that are MHA priorities. These include SB1137/HB1954, which prohibits the sale of tobacco products at health care facilities; HB2050/SB1119, a bill that would prohibit the sale of nicotine delivery products such as e-cigarettes, in addition to other tobacco products, to anyone under age 18; and HB2021, which would restrict the sale of tobacco products to children under the age of 21, including the sale of e-cigarettes.

Massachusetts hospitals have historically adhered to the policy against tobacco sales at healthcare facilities on a voluntary basis, and in fact, over 76% of MHA member hospitals have completely tobacco-free campuses. Member hospitals generally also include e-cigarettes in their anti-tobacco policies.

Here at MHA, we take our mandate to promote public health quite seriously, particularly when it comes to combatting the dangers of tobacco. We haven't hired tobacco users since 2011, and several of our member hospitals have joined MHA in establishing employment practices that screen for tobacco use. Our building and grounds are completely tobacco-free, and I recently had the honor of being recognized by Tobacco Free Mass for my work to promote this vitally important public health effort. MHA has submitted testimony in support of SB1137/HB1954HB2050/SB1119 and HB2021, and will continue to advocate strongly for these and other efforts to improve public health for all Massachusetts residents.


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